Translating Britishness

I have no excuses for my utter abdication of NaPoWriMo, but I thought you might like to have a snort at a Google translate poem I’ve just whipped up for the sake of playtime.

I was thinking about Britishness, and culture, and what divisive nonsense it can be. I wondered when was the last time I felt like the country was totally unified in something celebratory, and the first thing I thought of was Charles and Diana’s wedding, back before it all went to shite. I was nine at the time, oblivious to anything but the pageantry, but even then I thought it was a bit weird. Anyway, I thought I’d take some of the 1981 BBC coverage of the wedding, put it through several languages in Google Translate (all of them countries Britain has been at war with and/or occupied as an imperial force), and then see what came out.

imagesHow do you remember it?

A crowd of 600,000 people see their wedding day.

This is the most popular story of the broadcast program.

British day took advantage of a national holiday to celebrate.

We have our potato mashed and blue dye red white.

Diana, 20, almost there in time

for the ceremony in the glass carriage

with his father, Earl Spencer Clarence House Travel.

He said that one minute walk is called for three

and a half-juicy red train passed on the road,

with 7.5 meters (7.62 meters) by Emmanuel,

elephant teeth taffeta and ancient lace

designed by him flowing behind.

Arzobispo Canterbury Robert Ronsi Leadership

was the traditional service of the Church of England,

but how many of you were assisted by the pastor?

When the name of the prince is mixed,

the bride veins are briefly shown –

the caller Charles Philip Arthur George,

rather than Charles Phillippe.

Charles, 32, in the uniform of a naval commander,

confused his desires a little. After returning

from a small private company ceremony,

the Prince of Wales measures Pompey’s Hall

and the Raga in Elgar. The young couple

open the wagon kiss at the Buckingham Palace,

where they took birth on the balcony

to see the general public what they wanted to give.

 

 

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